Australasian Plant Pathology

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 255–261 | Cite as

Survey of Fusarium species associated with crown rot of wheat and barley in eastern Australia

  • D. Backhouse
  • A. A. Abubakar
  • L. W. Burgess
  • J. I. Dennisc
  • G. J. Hollaway
  • G. B. Wildermuth
  • H. Wallwork
  • F. J. Henry
Article

Abstract

Fusarium species associated with crown rot were isolated and identified from 409 wheat, barley or durum wheat crops from the eastern Australian grain belt between 1996 and 1999. Fusarium pseudograminearum was almost the only species isolated from crops in Queensland and New South Wales. F pseudograminearum was also the most common species in Victoria and South Australia, but F. culmorum was frequently isolated in these states. F. culmorum accounted for more than 70% of isolates from the Victorian high-rainfall (> 500 mm) region and the South-East region of South Australia. F culmorum comprised 18% of isolates from the Victorian medium-rainfall (350–500 mm) region, and 7% of isolates from each of the Victorian low-rainfall region and the Mid-North region of South Australia. F avenaceum, F crookwellense and F. graminearum were isolated very infrequently. The proportion of F. culmorum among isolates of Fusarium from districts in Victoria and South Australia was strongly correlated with climatic conditions around the end of the growing season, especially with rainfall in November.

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Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Backhouse
    • 1
  • A. A. Abubakar
    • 2
  • L. W. Burgess
    • 2
  • J. I. Dennisc
    • 3
  • G. J. Hollaway
    • 4
  • G. B. Wildermuth
    • 5
  • H. Wallwork
    • 3
  • F. J. Henry
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resources ManagementUniversity of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia
  2. 2.School of Land, Water and Crop SciencesUniversity of SydneyAustralia
  3. 3.South Australian Research and Development InstituteAdelaideAustralia
  4. 4.Department of Primary IndustriesPrimary Industries Research VictoriaHorshamAustralia
  5. 5.Leslie Research CentreDepartment of Primary IndustriesToowoombaAustralia

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