Australasian Plant Pathology

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 197–202 | Cite as

Cotton bunchy top: an aphid and graft transmitted cotton disease

  • A. Reddall
  • A. Ali
  • J. A. Able
  • J. Stonor
  • L. Tesoriero
  • P. R. Wright
  • M. A. Rezaian
  • L. J. Wilson
Article

Abstract

A new disease, termed cotton bunchy top (CBT), has been observed in Australian cotton fields since the 1998–99 cotton-growing season. Symptoms included short petioles and internodes, pale, light-green, angular patterns on the leaf margins, and a leathery texture of mature leaves. Affected plants had a reduced photosynthetic rate, leaf area, plant height, number of bolls, dry weight of bolls, roots and stem and ultimately yield. CBT was demonstrated to be graft-transmissible in glasshouse experiments. In the field, CBThotspots appeared to correlate with cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii) density and this species was identified as a CBT vector in controlled transmission tests. CBT symptoms and plant responses recorded in graft and aphid-inoculated plants were similar to those seen in the field. Seed transmission of CBT appears unlikely as none of 3930 plants grown from seed of CBT-affected plants developed symptoms.

Additional keywords

integrated pest management Gossypium hirsutum 

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Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Reddall
    • 1
  • A. Ali
    • 2
  • J. A. Able
    • 2
  • J. Stonor
    • 2
  • L. Tesoriero
    • 3
  • P. R. Wright
    • 4
  • M. A. Rezaian
    • 2
  • L. J. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.CSIRO Plant Industry and Australian Cotton Cooperative Research CentreNarrabriAustralia
  2. 2.CSIRO Plant IndustryHorticulture Research UnitGlen OsmondAustralia
  3. 3.NSW AgricultureElizabeth McArthur Agricultural InstituteMenangleAustralia
  4. 4.NSW AgricultureOrangeAustralia

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