Australasian Plant Pathology

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 95–96 | Cite as

Bacterial dieback of pistachio in Australia

  • E. Facelli
  • C. Taylor
  • E. Scott
  • R. Emmett
  • M. Fegan
  • M. Sedgley
Disease Notes or New Records

Abstract

Xanthomonas bacteria have been found in association with dieback of pistachio trees in Australia. Identification of the bacterial species and/or pathovar and epidemiological studies are in progress.

References

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  2. Fahy PC, Persley GJ (1983) ‘Plant bacterial diseases.’ (Academic Press: Sydney)Google Scholar
  3. Edwards M, Tassone L, Moran J, Constable F, Griffin T, Taylor C (1998a) ‘Pistachio canker and dieback.’ Mildura, HRDC, Final Report NT608, Agriculture Victoria. pp. 1–45.Google Scholar
  4. Edwards M, Taylor C (1998) Pistachio canker: the story so far. In ‘Proceedings of the eighth Australian nut industry council conference’. Albury, NSW, Australia, 30 July–2 August 1998. (Ed. J Wilkinson) pp. 31–32. (Australian Nut Industry Council Ltd: Bairnsdale, Vic.)Google Scholar
  5. Edwards M, Taylor C, Ferguson L, Kester D (1998b) Dieback and canker in Australian pistachios. Acta Horticulturae 470, 596–603.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Facelli
    • 1
  • C. Taylor
    • 2
  • E. Scott
    • 3
  • R. Emmett
    • 2
  • M. Fegan
    • 4
  • M. Sedgley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Horticulture, Viticulture and OenologyAdelaide UniversityGlen OsmondAustralia
  2. 2.Sunraysia Horticultural CentreDepartment of Natural Resources and EnvironmentMilduraAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Applied and Molecular EcologyAdelaide UniversityGlen OsmondAustralia
  4. 4.CRC for Tropical Plant Protection, Department of Microbiology and ParasitologyThe University of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia

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