Australasian Plant Pathology

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 353–356 | Cite as

Natural occurrence of perithecia of Gibberella coronicola on wheat plants with crown rot in Australia

  • B. A. Summerell
  • L. W. Burgess
  • D. Backhouse
  • S. Bullock
  • L. J. Swan
Article

Abstract.

The natural occurrence of perithecia of Gibberella coronicola T. Aoki & O’Donnell, the cause of crown rot of wheat, on wheat residues in the Moree district of New South Wales is reported. Cultures established from single ascospores taken from fertile perithecia of the fungus produced its anamorph, Fusarium pseudograminearum O’Donnell & T. Aoki. The morphology of the fungus is compared with published descriptions of perithecia produced in crossing experiments in culture. No differences were observed in the morphology or the dimensions of the fungus from the two sources. Additional keywords: Fusarium pseudograminearum, Ascomycete.

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Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. A. Summerell
    • 1
  • L. W. Burgess
    • 2
  • D. Backhouse
    • 3
  • S. Bullock
    • 1
  • L. J. Swan
    • 2
  1. 1.Royal Botanic GardensSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Fusarium Research Laboratory, Department of Crop SciencesUniversity of SydneyAustralia
  3. 3.School of Rural Science and Natural ResourcesUniversity of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia

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