Subjectivity

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 83–105

Haunted metaphor, transmitted affect: The pantemporality of subjective experience

  • Sadeq Rahimi
Original Article

Abstract

A major motivation for the rise of interest in subjectivity has been the failure of traditional theories of the person in predicting or explaining political affect. The failure may be attributed primarily to the inability of traditional theories to recognize and incorporate the collective and the temporal in their conceptualizations of human desire, experience and affect. While models of the collectively constituted subject have well replaced atomistic models of the individual, theories capable of temporal dislodgment of subjective experience are yet to gain a clear voice. Theoretic advances such as Raymond Williams’ structures of feeling, Derrida’s hauntology, or Abraham and Torok’s cryptonymy point the way to meaning based models of subjectivity that can accommodate multiplicities of both voices and temporalities in meaning and experience. A discussion of subjective experience as pantemporal is presented here specifically through an examination of metonymic and metaphoric functions as constituents of meaning and desire. Among other advantages, the pantemporality model is suggested to allow for analysis of such phenomena as intergenerational transmission of trauma and political affect.

Keywords

pantemporality subjectivity metaphor metonymy experience intergenerational transmission of affect 

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sadeq Rahimi
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Anthropology and PsychiatryUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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