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Social Theory & Health

, Volume 13, Issue 3–4, pp 245–266 | Cite as

Power, intersectionality and the life-course: Identifying the political and economic structures of welfare states that support or threaten health

  • Dennis Raphael
  • Toba BryantEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

The insights provided by Gøsta Esping-Andersen’s Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism on the origins and characteristics of social democratic, conservative and liberal welfare states make explicit many of the political and economic structures and processes that can impact on health and create health inequalities. Broad stroke analysis of welfare state differences indicates social democratic welfare states may fare better at promoting health and limiting health inequalities in specific instances. This article builds on Esping-Andersen’s insights to theorize how differences in sectoral power across and within forms of welfare states can shape the resources and supports available to those occupying various social locations during important periods of the life-course. It also specifies the specific health outcomes of special relevance to those situated in vulnerable social locations across the life-course.

Keywords

political economy life course social determinants of health 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Health, York UniversityTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of TechnologyOshawaCanada

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