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Security Journal

, Volume 30, Issue 3, pp 922–939 | Cite as

Reducing excessive police incidents: Do notices to owners work?

  • Troy C PayneEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Many municipalities throughout the United States have enacted ordinances that allow cities to charge property owners fees or fines for excessive police calls for service to the property. However, there are few studies of the outcomes of such ordinances. This study examines the impact on the count of police incidents of a notice of potential future fees or fines to property owners in Anchorage, Alaska and Green Bay, Wisconsin. It was found that police incidents are reduced by 24–28 per cent after a notice of potential fines, with two-thirds of properties experiencing a decline in police incidents post-notice. The implications for policy and practice are discussed.

Keywords

civil remedies place management problem solving crime analysis regulation super controllers 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Portions of this article were previously presented at the Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis Symposium, 18 June 2014. The author wishes to thank the Green Bay, Wisconsin Police Department and Anchorage, Alaska Police Department providing data for this study. Crime analysts in both departments – Michelle Arneson in Green Bay and Bryan Morberg in Anchorage – were extraordinarily helpful. The author would also like to thank the anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments.

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Justice Center, University of Alaska AnchorageAnchorageUSA

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