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Cause and evidence: on the erasure of women’s international thought and IR’s ‘failure as an intellectual project’

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Correspondence to Patricia Owens.

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Owens, P., Dunstan, S.C., Hutchings, K. et al. Cause and evidence: on the erasure of women’s international thought and IR’s ‘failure as an intellectual project’. Int Polit Rev 9, 241–245 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41312-021-00123-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/s41312-021-00123-z

Keywords

  • History
  • Women
  • International Thought