People-to-people façade of Nepal–China ties: a constructivist reading

Abstract

This paper claims that although Nepal–China relation, at present, is more government to government, Nepal–China ties are not free from the influence of the people-to-people (P2P) relations. The paper argues whether P2P relations have helped to strengthen the diplomatic, political and economic relations between Nepal and China, or not. In addition, the paper also discusses whether P2P relations have been enhanced by China-led Belt and Road Initiatives, as Nepal is also a member of BRI, and in addition, P2P is one of the pillars of BRI. Also, the write-up describes the significant roles that diaspora, connectivity, religion, myths and histories have played to shape the P2P relations between Nepal and China. The paper concludes by saying that P2P relation between Nepal and China is itself driven by the interest of the two states, unlike the P2P that Nepal has with India, which often influences the interests of the two states.

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Notes

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  5. 5.

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  10. 10.

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  11. 11.

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    The Kathmandu Post. (June 7, 2017). "OBOR Signing Cements Ties with China: Mahara". Accessed on October 17, 2017: http://kathmandupost.ekantipur.com/news/2017-06-07/obor-signing-cements-ties-with-china-mahara.html.

  13. 13.

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  16. 16.

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    Shrestha, Hiranya Lal. (2015). Sixty Years of Dynamic Partnership. Kathmandu: Nepal–China Society, pp. 238–239.

  18. 18.

    Extracted from the speech delivered by He Yong on September 22, 2010.

  19. 19.

    Bhattarai, Gaurav. (May 16, 2017). “Train of Thought". Republica, May 16, 2017 Accessed on October 28, 2017 http://www.myrepublica.com/news/20170/.

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    Ibid.

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  22. 22.

    Ibid.

  23. 23.

    Shrestha, Hiranya Lal. (2015). Sixty Years of Dynamic Partnership. Kathmandu: Nepal–China Society, p. 231.

  24. 24.

    Ibid, pp. 32–33.

  25. 25.

    ibid p. 232.

  26. 26.

    ibid, p. 237.

  27. 27.

    ibid, p.235.

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    Karki, Binod & Sachin Yogal Shrestha. (2016). The Great Bouddhanath Stupa. Bouddha: Shree Bouddhanath Area Development Committee, p. 100.

  29. 29.

    ibid.

  30. 30.

    Shrestha, Hiranya Lal. (2015). Sixty Years of Dynamic Partnership. Kathmandu: Nepal–China Society, p. 236.

  31. 31.

    ibid.

  32. 32.

    Amatya, Sumitra. (Feb 16, 2017). "OBOR opportunities". Republica. Accessed on January 18, 2018. http://www.myrepublica.com/news/14394/.

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    Bhusal, Ramesh. (November 7, 2017). "One Belt, One Road Fuels Nepal’s Dreams". The Wire. Accessed on December 23, 2018 https://thewire.in/156554/nepal-china-obor-transport-infrastructure/.

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  36. 36.

    Ibid.

  37. 37.

    China Daily. (August 8, 2017). "Construction of China-assisted airport project formally begins in Nepal". Accessed on October 27, 2017. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/business/2017-08/03/content_30343280.htm.

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Bhattarai, G., Ali Khan, R.N. People-to-people façade of Nepal–China ties: a constructivist reading. Int Polit 58, 223–234 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41311-020-00223-x

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Keywords

  • People-to-people
  • China
  • Nepal
  • Constructivism