Reflecting on the South African Long-Term Mitigation Scenario Process a Decade Later

Abstract

The 2006–2007 Long Term Mitigation Scenario planning process (LTMS) was a seminal South African climate mitigation policy initiative that continues to underpin the country’s climate mitigation policy today. Whilst acknowledging the LTMS’s significant contributions, the article explores how the particular conceptualization of the policy problem under the LTMS as linear, sectoral, technical and environmental might be contributing to inadequate progress on implementation a decade on. Additional constraining factors are identified as being a lack of attention to policy process after the LTMS, and a lack of engagement with the political economy realities of climate mitigation in South Africa.

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Fig. 1

Notes

  1. 1.

    At the time this was the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism. In 2009, it was split into two separate departments, with the environmental capacity housed in the current Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA). To avoid confusion, the current acronym is used throughout the text.

  2. 2.

    www.mapsprogramme.org.

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Tyler, E., Torres Gunfaus, M. Reflecting on the South African Long-Term Mitigation Scenario Process a Decade Later. Development 59, 328–334 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41301-017-0107-8

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Keywords

  • South Africa
  • Climate mitigation policy
  • Long-term planning
  • Development
  • Political economy
  • Implementation
  • Social capital