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Whatever happened to repeat victimisation?

Abstract

Crime is concentrated at the individual level (hot dots) as well as at area level (hot spots). Research on repeat victimisation affords rich prevention opportunities but has been increasingly marginalised by policy makers and implementers despite repeat victims accounting for increasing proportions of total crime. The present paper seeks to trigger a resurgence of interest in research and initiatives based on the prevention of repeat victimisation.

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    http://www.cla.temple.edu/cj/resources/near-repeat-calculator/ accessed Jan 22, 2018.

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Correspondence to Ken Pease.

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Pease, K., Ignatans, D. & Batty, L. Whatever happened to repeat victimisation?. Crime Prev Community Saf 20, 256–267 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41300-018-0051-x

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Keywords

  • Repeat victimisation
  • Crime concentration
  • Victimisation inequality
  • Evidence-based criminology