Political Theory with an Ethnographic Sensibility

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Acknowledgements

For invaluable discussion of these issues, the editor, Bernardo Zacka, would like to thank the contributors to this Critical Exchange, the participants and organizers of the Workshop in New Methods in Political theory held at the London School of Economics in May 2019, the panelists and audience for an APSA Panel on Ethnography and Political Theory held in Washington D.C. in August 2019, the Critical Exchange editor for the journal, Mihaela Mihai, as well as Lisa Herzog, Janosch Prinz, and Valentina Pugliano.

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Zacka, B., Ackerly, B., Elster, J. et al. Political Theory with an Ethnographic Sensibility. Contemp Polit Theory (2020). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41296-020-00433-1

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