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Identifying individuals at risk of being radicalised via the internet

Abstract

In an effort to better understand the risk of individuals being radicalised via the internet, this paper re-examines the phenomenon of online radicalisation by focusing on four considerations of interest: individual, online environment, interactions between individual and the online environment, and protective elements. A key premise of the discussion presented is that the different theoretical assumptions and linkages underlying each consideration are not only reconcilable but that together they provide a more comprehensive understanding of assessing risk of radicalisation via the internet than any perspective by itself. Implications for operationalising these four considerations and their associated factors to identify individuals at risk of being radicalised via the internet will also be discussed.

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Acknowledgments

The views expressed in this article are the authors’ only and do not represent the official position or view of the Ministry of Home Affairs, Singapore. The authors would like to thank Dr Damien Cheong of Nanyang Technological University for his comments.

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Correspondence to Loo Seng Neo.

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Neo, L.S., Dillon, L. & Khader, M. Identifying individuals at risk of being radicalised via the internet. Secur J 30, 1112–1133 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41284-016-0080-z

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Keywords

  • online radicalisation
  • internet
  • online environment
  • interactions
  • protective elements