Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 347–363 | Cite as

Gratitude and leave-taking: Editorial reflections, 2003–2017

Original Article

Abstract

In this article we reflect on our time as editors of Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society. The article reviews some of the journal’s major contributions to psychoanalytic understanding of social and political problems; considers whether or not we are entering a post-neoliberal world; and discusses some of the challenges faced by PCS given the marginal status of psychoanalysis in the wider culture, the journal’s emphasis on interdisciplinarity, and its commitment to providing a space for multiple psychoanalytic voices. The article’s later sections consider some of the areas that remain underdeveloped in the journal’s coverage. In particular, the penultimate section explores the challenging task of specifying whether or not social entities, as opposed to individuals, can be said to have properties that are unconscious in the psychoanalytic sense.

Keywords

Psychoanalysis Culture & Society neoliberalism status of psychoanalysis interdisciplinarity unconscious dimensions of the social world 

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BrooklineUSA
  2. 2.Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Gardiner 2The Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

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