Mobile archives of indigeneity: Building La Comunidad Ixim through organizing in the Maya diaspora

Abstract

This article examines how La Comunidad Ixim, a collective of young second-generation Mayas and Guatemalans in Los Angeles, bridge their family histories and the political insights gained from their participation in other forms of social justice organizing to create a mobile archive of indigeneity. Mobile archives of indigeneity are archives that document the epistemologies and experiences of Maya migrants in materials that are also mobile and can move with migrants. Through an analysis of interviews with the organizers of La Comunidad Ixim and a close reading of their children’s book, this article emphasizes that mobile archives of indigeneity become sites that refuse to be fixed in space and that challenge the ongoing colonial regimes of power that, despite differing articulations, remain entrenched in positioning all Indigenous peoples as disappearing or gone.

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Acknowledgements

I am immensely grateful to the members of La Comunidad Ixim for offering their stories and support in the process of completing this work.

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Correspondence to Floridalma Boj Lopez.

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Boj Lopez, F. Mobile archives of indigeneity: Building La Comunidad Ixim through organizing in the Maya diaspora. Lat Stud 15, 201–218 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41276-017-0056-0

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Keywords

  • Mayans
  • Guatemalan Americans
  • Indigeneity
  • Archives
  • Children’s literature
  • Los Angeles