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Global informalism and the G20

Abstract

This article considers efforts to improve the effectiveness of global governance by examining the nature and consequences of informal global governance by focusing upon the operation of the Group of 20 (G20). It does so by considering the relationship between the existing forms of global constitutionalism, which indicate a foundational role for rules and laws within the existing forms of multilateral global governance, with informal forms of global governance operating with respect to the G20. This is conducted by considering a constructivist understanding of diplomatic practices which operate to sustain international cooperation and better manage multilateral global governance. The article contends that informal global governance is animated by an underlying non-legal disposition of global informalism and is evident in various informal diplomatic practices in the operation of the G20. The article seeks to better comprehend the consequences of informal global governance and challenge the field of global constitutionalism by highlighting the important but problematic nature of non-legal and informal global practices in contemporary global governance.

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Slaughter, S. Global informalism and the G20. J Int Relat Dev 24, 533–554 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41268-020-00201-z

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Keywords

  • Diplomatic practices
  • Global constitutionalism
  • Global governance
  • G20
  • Informal intergovernmental organisations
  • Multilateralism