THE HIDDEN VOICES: EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE AND UNCONSCIOUS COMMUNICATION IN THE ANALYTIC SPACE*

Abstract

In a previous work I tried to show how a parent’s traumatic experiences can weigh on the following generations, approaching these phenomena in terms of introjection and incorporation. Traumatized patients who inherited such burdens suffered a block of their vital abilities, and are then challenged to later acquire the ability to symbolize what had remained unelaborated by previous generations. Accidental impressions, foreign to the patient’s story, possibly a result of a certain pre-understanding of the patient’s unconscious communications, emerge in countertransference and may reveal hitherto unexpressed dimensions, dissociated psychic areas of the patient.

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Acknowledgement

I would like to thank Tommaso Nelli for his generous contributions to finalizing this article in English.

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Correspondence to Andrea Ciacci.

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Andrea Ciacci, Ph.D. Psychologist, and psychoanalytic psychotherapist in private practice in Florence and Siena; Full member and on the Board of Directors of the Italian Society of Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy “Sándor Ferenczi”.

Address Correspondence to Andrea Ciacci, Ph. D. Via Gallurì, n. 33 – 53036 Poggibonsi, SI, Italy. Email: a.ciacci.psy@gmail.com.

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Ciacci, A. THE HIDDEN VOICES: EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE AND UNCONSCIOUS COMMUNICATION IN THE ANALYTIC SPACE*. Am J Psychoanal 79, 507–516 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1057/s11231-019-09217-y

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Keywords

  • unconscious communication
  • implicit elaboration
  • countertransference
  • reverie