Observations on the Centrality of Security in Psychoanalytic Supervision: A View from the Interpersonal Tradition and Attachment Perspective

Abstract

Using theoretical concepts from the Interpersonal tradition in psychoanalysis and supported by findings from the attachment literature, the utility of attending to the issue of psychological security in supervision is considered for its potential to enable increased capacities for conducting psychoanalytic treatment.

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Correspondence to Stefan R. Zicht.

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Stefan R. Zicht, PsyD, Supervising Analyst, Fellow, Faculty, and Former Director of the Licensure-Qualifying Program in Psychoanalysis: William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology.

Address correspondence to: Stefan R. Zicht, PsyD, 185 West End Avenue, Suite 1C, New York, NY 10023, USA. Email: srz2@rcn.com

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Zicht, S.R. Observations on the Centrality of Security in Psychoanalytic Supervision: A View from the Interpersonal Tradition and Attachment Perspective. Am J Psychoanal 79, 375–387 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1057/s11231-019-09211-4

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Keywords

  • interpersonal psychoanalysis
  • psychoanalytic supervision
  • Harry Stack Sullivan
  • psychological security
  • attachment
  • anxiety