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Editors’ introduction to special issue on psychology and the other: The historical-political in psychoanalysis’ ethical turn

Abstract

After a brief description of the ethical turn and its historical-political dimension within psychoanalysis, this article will introduce the special issue’s four papers and two responses, all of which were presented at the 2013 Psychology and the Other Conference. These articles represent substantive additions to the burgeoning literature highlighting the intersections of ethical phenomenology, hermeneutics, psychoanalysis and political life. They provide innovative conceptions of the intergenerational transmission of historical and political practices and the shape and nature of ethical subjectivity and its relationship to the unconscious, and offer new modes for understanding political subversion.

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Correspondence to David M Goodman.

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Goodman, D., Layton, L. Editors’ introduction to special issue on psychology and the other: The historical-political in psychoanalysis’ ethical turn. Psychoanal Cult Soc 19, 225–231 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1057/pcs.2014.28

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/pcs.2014.28

Keywords

  • other
  • psychoanalysis
  • race
  • intergenerational transmission
  • ethical turn
  • historical-political