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Indigenous Knowledge Within a Global Knowledge System

Abstract

Faced with globalizing forces that promote universal approaches to knowledge and understanding, indigenous peoples have reacted by abandoning the old ways or alternately seeking to re-discover ancient wisdoms as foundations for pathways to the future. Increasingly, however, a third way has been to focus on the interface between indigenous knowledge and other knowledge systems, such as science, to generate new insights, built from two systems. The interface approach recognizes the distinctiveness of different knowledge systems, but sees opportunities for employing aspects of both so that dual benefits can be realized and indigenous worldviews can be matched with contemporary realities.

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Durie, M. Indigenous Knowledge Within a Global Knowledge System. High Educ Policy 18, 301–312 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.hep.8300092

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Keywords

  • indigenous
  • knowledge
  • globalization
  • science
  • interface
  • research