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Who is responsible for rehabilitating the poor? The case for church-based financial services for the poor

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Abstract

This article is a qualitative study, the first part of an ongoing empirical study on the role of churches in providing financial access to the poor. It begins with the question of whether Christian Churches should be involved in providing financial services for the poor. Drawing on the teachings of the Bible, Catholic Social Teachings (CSTs), it concludes that providing such a service is consistent with Christian principles. It then uses the theory of people's psychological sense of a community, the Bible, CST and the extant literature to develop a number of propositions that could form a framework for church-based micro-finance institutions (MFIs).

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1holds a PhD in Finance and Marketing from Rutgers University and the Juris doctor degree from the University of Miami School of Law. He is a Professor in the College and Graduate School of Business at Florida Atlantic University at Boca Raton, Florida. He has published in several peer-reviewed journals in the areas of services, law, economics, interface between finance and marketing, and innovations.

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Koku, P., Acquaye, H. Who is responsible for rehabilitating the poor? The case for church-based financial services for the poor. J Financ Serv Mark 15, 346–356 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1057/fsm.2010.28

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/fsm.2010.28

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