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The effects of perceived salesperson listening effectiveness in the financial industry

Abstract

The goals of this paper are twofold: (a) to test the multidimensional structure of the listening construct and (b) to identify major consequences of perceived salesperson listening effectiveness. A survey was completed by more than 400 buyer–seller dyads. Following structural equations modelling analyses, results show that customers’ perceptions of listening effectiveness is positively (and strongly) associated with service quality, trust, satisfaction, word-of-mouth propensity, purchase intentions and sales performance. Numerous managerial implications are proposed to entice organisations to emphasise salespeople listening skills as a competitive advantage. Research opportunities are also presented to accrue academic efforts in understanding the truly rich role of listening.

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Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the support of the organisations who participated in this study. The authors are also grateful for the financial support offered by the Financial Services Research Chair of the University of Quebec in Montreal.

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Correspondence to Jasmin Bergeron.

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Bergeron, J., Laroche, M. The effects of perceived salesperson listening effectiveness in the financial industry. J Financ Serv Mark 14, 6–25 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1057/fsm.2009.1

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Keywords

  • listening
  • selling
  • relationship
  • performance
  • financial institutions
  • bank