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Feminist Review

, Volume 94, Issue 1, pp 93–116 | Cite as

a migrant ethic of care? negotiating care and caring among migrant workers in London's low-pay economy

  • Kavita Datta
  • Cathy McIlwaine
  • Yara Evans
  • Joanna Herbert
  • Jon May
  • Jane Wills
Article

Abstract

A care deficit is clearly evident in global cities such as London and is attributable to an ageing population, the increased employment of native-born women, prevalent gender ideologies that continue to exempt men from much reproductive work, as well as the failure of the state to provide viable alternatives. However, while it is now acknowledged that migrant women, and to a lesser extent, migrant men, step in to provide care in cities such as London, there is less research on how this shapes the nature, politics and ethics of care. Drawing upon empirical research with low-paid migrant workers employed as domiciliary care providers in London, this paper explores the emergence of a distinct migrant ethic of care that is critically shaped by the caring work that migrant women and men perform.

Keywords

migrants ethics care care workers London 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge the Economic and Social Research Council for funding this research on low-paid migrant workers in London, as well as their colleague, Professor Isabel Dyck, for her useful comments on an earlier draft of this paper.

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Copyright information

© Feminist Review 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kavita Datta
  • Cathy McIlwaine
  • Yara Evans
  • Joanna Herbert
  • Jon May
  • Jane Wills

There are no affiliations available

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