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Contradictions of the Bologna Process: Academic Excellence Versus Political Obsessions

Abstract

Understanding the Bologna Process is important, because its reforms (curriculum reform mixed with funding and governing reforms) have an effect on the discipline through the European Higher Education Area and European Research Area. The article discusses the state of the Bologna Process and its contradictions, the links between education and research and the implications for political science as a discipline.

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berndtson, e. Contradictions of the Bologna Process: Academic Excellence Versus Political Obsessions. Eur Polit Sci 12, 440–447 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1057/eps.2013.24

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/eps.2013.24

Keywords

  • European Higher Education Area
  • European Research Area
  • political science
  • interdisciplinarity