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The Bologna Dynamic: Strengths and Weaknesses of the Europeanisation of Higher Education

Abstract

This article advances the argument that when weighing up the strengths and weaknesses of the Bologna Process it is necessary to incorporate the perspective of academics, and to discuss whether and how the Bologna Process can be supportive of academics as they adjust to changing notions of academic autonomy in knowledge societies.

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Correspondence to anne corbett.

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corbett, a., henkel, m. The Bologna Dynamic: Strengths and Weaknesses of the Europeanisation of Higher Education. Eur Polit Sci 12, 415–423 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1057/eps.2013.21

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Keywords

  • Bologna Process
  • higher education
  • Europeanisation
  • academic autonomy