Contemporary Political Theory

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 185–206 | Cite as

Identity politics and democratic nondomination

  • Clarissa Rile Hayward
  • Ron Watson
Article

Abstract

This article brings into conversation two important literatures in contemporary political theory that have, for the most part, failed to engage one another: work spanning more than two decades on multiculturalism and identity politics, and neo-republican work on nondomination. The authors take as their starting-point two widely endorsed claims: that identities are constructs and that state actors play a crucial role in their construction. Their question is how democratic states should shape identity, and their central claim is that states should do so in ways that promote what they call democratic nondomination. This ideal, they stress, is multifaceted. It has both an action-level and a system-level component. In addition, it has both an inter-agentive and an impersonal dimension. Attending to democratic nondomination in its complexity is crucial to the project of evaluating alternative possible forms of state identity construction.

Keywords

constructivism democracy identity multiculturalism nondomination recognition 

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clarissa Rile Hayward
    • 1
  • Ron Watson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Political Science, Washington UniversitySt LouisUSA
  2. 2.Lewis & Clark VenturesClaytonUSA

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