Foundations of modern international theory

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  1. 1.

    The question is much more complicated, and of course Kant’s later account of indigenous ways of life and his related theory of political legitimacy is very different from that of Locke. For a discussion that traces this development and illustrates Kant’s early theory of germs and dispositions as it relates to the genesis of human races (see Ypi, 2014).

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Hutchings, K., Bartelson, J., Keene, E. et al. Foundations of modern international theory. Contemp Polit Theory 13, 387–418 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1057/cpt.2014.23

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