FEMALE SEXUALITY, NATIONALISM AND LARGE GROUP IDENTITY

Abstract

Nationalist movements are emerging today everywhere in the world. Many of them display a high level of aggression and a negative attitude toward sexuality and especially female sexuality. Along with this, erotic fiction with a sadomasochistic orientation has achieved great success and has hundreds of millions of readers in the world. This collective fantasy allows some integration of aggression in sexual life while questioning liberal morality and its equality in gender roles and conservative morality and its idea of control over passion. Both phenomena may represent different responses to the appearance of a new female sexuality threatening the social structure we know.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Andre, J. (2002). Origenes de la sexualidad. Madrid: Síntesis.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Bourke, J. (1999). An intimate history of killing. Face-to-face killing in twentieth-century warfare. London: Granta Books.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Chasseguet-Smirgel, J. (1984). Creativity and perversion. New York: Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Cherbuliez, T. (2013). Le therapeute et le patient. Digne les Bains: Baroch Editions.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Chodorow, N. J. (1996). Theoretical gender and clinical gender: Epistemological reflections on the psychology of women. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 44S, 215–238.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Damasio, A. (2000). The feeling of what happens: Body and emotion in the making of consciousness. New York: Mariner Books.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Diamond, L. M. (2008). Sexual fluidity. Understanding human love and desire. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Dio Bleichmar, E. (1985). El feminismo espontáneo de la histeria. Madrid: Adograf.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Edmundson, M. (2013). Why teach? In defence of a real education. New York: Bloomsbury.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Elzo, J. (2003). Tipología y modelos de relación familiar. In Congreso La familia en la sociedad del siglo, 21, pp. 17–18. Madrid: Fundación de Ayuda Contra la Drogadicción.

  11. Erikson, E. (1950). Childhood and society. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Fink, B. (1997). A Clinical introduction to Lacanian psychoanalysis. Theory and technique. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Fonagy, P. (2008). A genuinely developmental theory of sexual enjoyment and its implications for psychoanalytic technique. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 56, 11–36.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  14. Fonagy, P. (2009). Psychosexuality and psychoanalysis. An overview. In P. Fonagy, R. Krause & M. Leuzinger-Bohleven (Eds.) Identity, gender and sexuality pp. 1–19). London: Karnac Books.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Fornari, F. (2005). La psicoanalisi della guerra. Rivista Psicoanalitca, 51, 95–178.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Freud, S. (1896). The aetiology of hysteria. Standard Edition, (Vol. 3, pp. 189–221). London: Hogarth.

  17. Gonzalez-Torres, M. A. (2014). A quest for truth or solidarity? A third way ahead for psychoanalysis. International Forum of Psychoanalysis, 23, doi:10.1080/0803706X.2014.953579.

  18. Gonzalez-Torres, M. A. & Fernández-Rivas, A. (2014). Some reflections on nationalism, identity and sexuality. International Forum of Psychoanalysis, 23 (3), 135–143.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  19. Green, A. (1995). Has sexuality anything to do with psychoanalysis? International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 76, 871–883.

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  20. Hobsbawm, E. (1992). The invention of tradition. Canto Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Illouz, E. (2014). Hard core romance. Fifty shades of Grey, best sellers and society. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  22. James, E. L. (2012). Fifty shades of Grey. New York: Vintage.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Juni, S. (2009). The role of sexuality in sadism: Object relations theory perspectives. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 69, 314–329.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  24. Kernberg, O. F. (1995). Love relations. Normality and pathology. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  25. Kernberg, O. F. (2005). Unconscious conflict in the light of contemporary psychoanalytic findings. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 74, 65–81.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  26. Kernberg, O. F. (2011). The sexual couple: A psychoanalytic exploration. Psychoanalytic Review, 98, 217–245.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  27. Kernberg, O. F. (2012). The inseparable nature of love and aggression. Clinical and theoretical perspectives. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  28. Klein, M., Heinman, P., Isaacs, S. & Riviere, J. (Eds.) (1946). Developments in psychoanalysis. London: Hogarth Press.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Kristeva, J. (1991). Strangers to ourselves. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  30. Lacan, J. (2006). The mirror stage as formative of the function as revealed in psychoanalytic experience. In: Écrits: The first complete edition in English (pp. 75–81). New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

    Google Scholar 

  31. Laplanche, J. (1995). Seduction, persecution, revelation. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 76, 663–682.

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  32. Lemann, N. (2013). The new deal we didn’t know. The New York Review of Books. September 26, pp. 23–25.

  33. Mitchell, S. A. (1988). Relational concepts in psychoanalysis: An integration. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  34. Nussbaum, M. & Sihvola, J. (Eds.) (2002). The sleep of reason. Erotic experience and sexual ethics in ancient Greece and Rome. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  35. Orwell, G. (1950). 1984. London: Signet Classics.

    Google Scholar 

  36. Perroud, N., Galli-Carminati, G. & Carminati-Garbino, G. M. V. (2009). Le troisième pole de l’archétype feminin. In G. Galli-Carminati (Ed.) La femme guerriere. Le troisième pole de l’archétype feminin (pp. 11–30). Firenze: L’Autore Libri Firenze.

    Google Scholar 

  37. Phillips, A. (1998). A defense of masochism. New York: Saint Martin’s Press.

    Google Scholar 

  38. Réage, P. [pen name of Anne Declos]. (1954). Histoire d’O [The story of O] Paris, France: Chez Jean-Jacques Pauvert. English publication (1965) New York: Grove Press.

  39. Semelin, J. (2009). Purify and destroy: The political uses of massacre and genocide. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  40. Sen, A. (1992). Missing women. British Medical Journal, 304, 587–588.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  41. Sen, A. (2003). Missing women. Revisited. British Medical Journal, 327, 1297–1298.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  42. Sen, A. (2013). India’s women: The mixed truth. The New York Review of Books. Vol. LX, Number 15. October 10–23, pp. 24–27.

  43. Stoller, R. J. (1984). Sex and gender. London: Karnac Books.

    Google Scholar 

  44. Stoller, R. J. (1985). Presentations of gender. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  45. Stoller, R. J. (1991). Pain and passion. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press.

    Google Scholar 

  46. Stoller, R. J. (2009). Sweet dreams, erotic plots. London: Karnac Books.

    Google Scholar 

  47. Volkan, V., Ast, G. & Greer, W. (2002). The third Reich in the unconscious: Transgenerational transmission and its consequences. New York: Brunner-Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  48. Volkan, V. (2013). Psicología de las sociedades en conflicto. Barcelona: Iniciativas Grupales.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Torres.

Additional information

1Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Torres, M.D., Ph.D.is a Full Professor at the Department of Neuroscience, University of the Basque Country; Head of the Psychiatry Department, Basurto University Hospital. Bilbao, Spain and a Training Analyst. Centro Psicoanalítico de Madrid.

2Aranzazu Fernández-Rivas, M.D., Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Department of Neuroscience, University of the Basque Country and Section Chief, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Basurto University Hospital, Bilbao, Spain.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Angel Gonzalez-Torres, M., Fernández-Rivas, A. FEMALE SEXUALITY, NATIONALISM AND LARGE GROUP IDENTITY. Am J Psychoanal 75, 416–437 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1057/ajp.2015.47

Download citation

Keywords

  • sexuality
  • nationalism
  • erotic fiction
  • aggression