CYPRUS TURKISH FAIRY TALES: GLIMPSE OF A HARMONIOUS PAST

Abstract

On the island of Cyprus, believed to be the birthplace of Aphrodite, the Muslim minority (settled there following the Ottoman conquest of the island in 1571) and Orthodox Christians (the native majority) lived together in peace for hundreds of years. However, as a result of ethnic conflict in the late 1950s, the Muslim Cypriot Turks established their own political state in the north of the island in 1974, and Cyprus was divided into northern Turkish and southern Greek sections. This paper attempts to examine historical, religious, cultural and psychological aspects of the relationship between these two large groups, prior to recent conflicts, by studying fairy tales told by Turkish Cypriots about a hundred years ago. It is hoped that this paper will encourage similar studies of other communities where different large-group identities live side by side, and that such studies may support their peaceful co-existence.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Bettelheim, B. (1977). The uses of enchanment: The meaning and importance of fairy tales. Middlesex, UK: Penguin Books.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Çılgın, A. S. (2007). Çocuk Edebiyatı. (Children literture). Istanbul: Morpa Yayınları.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Eberhard, W. & Boratav, P. N. (1953). Typen türkischer Volksmaerchen [Types of Turkish folk tales]. Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur (Academy of Sciences and Literature) Veröffentlichungen der orientalischen Kommission, XI Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner Verlag.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Erdoğdu, S. K. (2009). Kıbrıs’ta Osmanlılar (Ottomans in Cyprus). Lefkoşa: Galeri Kültür Yayınları.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Freud, S. (1913). The occurrence in dreams of material from fairy tales. Standard Edition, 12, 279–288. London: Vintage Books, 1958.

  6. Gökbulut, B. & Yeniasır, M. (2013). Kıbrıs Türk halk masalları üzerine yapılan çalışmaların incelenmesi. [An analysis of the study of Cyprus Turkish tales]. Milli Folklor Dergisi, 25 (12), 231–243.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Gökçeoğlu, M. (2004). Toplu Masallar II [Collected fairytales – II]. Nicosia: Özyay.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Hikmet, N. (2012). Masallar – Masallar, Hikayeler 3 [Fairy tales – Fairy tales, stories 3]. Istanbul: Yapı Kredi Yayınları (Original work published in 2002).

    Google Scholar 

  9. Islamoğlu, M. & Öznur, Ş. (2012). Karşılaştırmalı Kıbrıs Türk ve Rum masalları [Comparative analysis of Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot tales]. Nicosia: Gökada.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Kırımhan, S. N. (1995). Kıbrıs masalları ile Anadolu masallarının motif yonunden Mukavemesi. [The survey of themes between Cyprus fairy tales to Anatolian fairy tales]. Milli Folklor, 4 (7–27), 49–50.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Kelman, H., Bieber, I. & Gutheil, E. A. (1956). Life history as therapy: Part III. The symbolizing process. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 16 (2), 145–173.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Kinross, Lord (1979). The Ottoman centuries: The rise and fall of the Turkish empire. London: Harper Perennial.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Mahler, M. S. (1968). On human symbiosis and the vicissitudes of individuation. New York: International Universities Press.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Milbourne, A. (2013). Binbir Gece Masalları [One thousand and one nights fairytales], S.Çıngay (Trans.). İstanbul: Remzi.

  15. Muñoz, M.A. (2008). Fairy Tales and Trauma. Presenter: Robin S. Goldberg, Ph.D. Date: May 3, 2007. American Journal of. Psychoanalysis, 68:301–302.

  16. Nesim, A. (1990). Kıbrıslı Türklerin kimliği. [The identity of Turkish cypriots]. KKTC Milli Eğitim ve Kültür Bakanlığı Yayınları, No:17. Nicosia: Sistem.

  17. Roheim, G. (1992). Fire in the dragon and other psychoanalytic essays on Folklore. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Saraçoğlu, E. (2004). Kıbrıs Ağzı [The Cyprus dialect]. Nicosia: Ateş Matbaacılık (Original work published in 1980).

    Google Scholar 

  19. Saydam, B. M. (2011). Deli Dumrul'un Bilinci - “Türk-İslam Ruhu” Üzerine Bir Kültür Psikolojisi Denemesi [The conscious of Crazy Dumrul - A cultural psychological attempt to understand the “soul of Turkish –Islam”]. Istanbul: Metis.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Shafii, M. & Shafii, S. (1974). Symbolic expression of developmental conflicts in a Persian fairy tale. International Review of Psycho-Analysis, 1 (1–2), 219–226.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Shapiro, R. & Katz, C.L. (1978). Fairy tales, splitting and development. Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 14 (4), 591–602.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Tatar, M. (1999). The classic fairy tales. London: W.W. Norton & Company.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Tatar, Maria (2003). The hard facts of the Grimm’s’ fairy Tales. Princeton, Oxford: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Volkan, V. D. (1979). Cyprus: War and adaptation. Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia.

    Google Scholar 

  25. Volkan, V. D. (2013). Enemies on the couch: A psychopolitical journey through war and peace. Durham, NC: Pitchstone Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Volkan, V. D. (2014). Psychoanalysis, international relations, and diplomacy: A sourcebook on large-group psychology. London: Karnac.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Erdem Beyoğlu.

Additional information

1Erdem Beyoğlu, M.D. is a Staff Child Psychiatrist, Barış Hospital, Nicosia, Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus; Board Member of the Cyprus Turkish Paediatric Association and a candidate at Psychoanalytic Association for Training, Research and Development (PSIKE) in Istanbul, Turkey.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Beyoğlu, E. CYPRUS TURKISH FAIRY TALES: GLIMPSE OF A HARMONIOUS PAST. Am J Psychoanal 75, 382–393 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1057/ajp.2015.41

Download citation

Keywords

  • fairy tales
  • identity
  • large-group conflicts
  • Cypriot Turks and Cypriot Greeks