WHAT IS EFFECTIVE IN THE THERAPEUTIC PROCESS? A ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION

Abstract

In her contribution to the 1956 Roundtable, Elizabeth Kilpatrick outlines her theoretical understanding of neurosis and points out that self-protective solutions, used to keep painful conflicts out of awareness, gradually alienate the suffering persons from their inner resources. Guided by her understanding of the Horneyan framework of personality, Dr. Kilpatrick identifies two major tasks for treatment: the strengthening of the patient’s constructive incentives for self-fulfillment, which helps nurture the potential for the gradual resolution of the neurotic structure. She elaborates that much depends upon the establishment and maintenance of a unique, sensitive relatedness between patient and therapist. The therapist’s skill to create an accepting atmosphere gradually helps patients to become more connected and increasingly able to utilize their inner constructiveness.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Kelman, H. (Ed.) (1956). Goals in therapy: A round table discussion. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 16, 3–23.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Kilpatrick, E. (1957). What is effective in the therapeutic process? A round table discussion. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 17, 4–7.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Eckardt, M. H. (2006). Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 34, 5–12.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Editorial (1970). In memoriam. Elizabeth Kilpatrick, M.D. (1892–1969). American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 30, 87–88.

  5. Horney, K. (1939). New ways in psychoanalysis. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Horney, K. (1942). Self analysis. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Horney, K. (1945). Our inner conflicts. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Ivemey, M. (1945). The meaning of transference. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 5, 3–15.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Metzger, E. (1956). Understanding the patient. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 16, 26–31.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Slipp, S. (1999). From divergence to convergence in American psychoanalysis: The influence of Freud’s background on the splitting of the psychoanalytic movement. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Psychiatry, 27, 503–514.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Elizabeth Kilpatrick.

Additional information

This paper was presented at the Round Table Discussion, “What is effective in the therapeutic process?” at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in Chicago, Illinois on May 1, 1956. The panel was moderated by Bella S. Van Bark, M.D. Other presenters were: Lewis Wolberg, M.D., Marianne Horney Eckardt, M.D., Frederick A. Weiss, M.D., Leslie H. Farber, M.D., Louis E. DeRosis, M.D. and Silvano Arieti, M.D. This article was first published in the American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 1957, 17: 47, and is republished here.

1Elizabeth Kilpatrick, M.D., (1892—1969) was a distinguished member of the Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis and the American Institute for Psychoanalysis, New York City.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Kilpatrick, E. WHAT IS EFFECTIVE IN THE THERAPEUTIC PROCESS? A ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION. Am J Psychoanal 75, 175–181 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1057/ajp.2015.3

Download citation

Keywords

  • inner conflicts
  • alienation from the self
  • inner resources
  • constructiveness
  • relatedness between patient and therapist
  • mutuality