RESPONSE TO THE RESPONSES… WHAT IS EFFECTIVE IN PSYCHOANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY? A HISTORICAL REPRISE

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The Roundtable Discussion, “What is effective in the therapeutic process?” took place at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in Chicago, IL on May 1, 1956. Bella S. Van Bark, M.D., moderated the panel. Other presenters were Elizabeth Kilpatrick, M.D., Lewis Wolberg, M.D., Marianne Eckardt Horney, M.D., Frederick A. Weiss, M.D., Leslie H. Farber, M.D., Louis E. DeRosis, M.D., and Silvano Arieti, M.D. First published in the American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 1957, 17:3–33, and is republished in this issue.

  2. 2.

    The Scientific Program Committee of the Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis, under the chairmanship of Dr. Frederick A. Weiss, arranged the Roundtable Discussion, “What Leads to Basic Change in Psychoanalytic Therapy?” at the New York Academy of Medicine in the Spring of 1964. Melvin Boigon, M.D., moderated the panel. Other participants were William V. Silverberg, M.D., Frederick A. Weiss, M.D., and Alfred H. Rifkin, M.D. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 1965, 25:129–141.

  3. 3.

    Ronald C. Naso, Ph.D., ABPP is psychoanalyst and clinical psychologist in independent practice in Stamford, CT. He is currently a director and secretary of the American Board and Academy of Psychoanalysis as well as a member of the ABAPsa workgroup responsible for the development of educational and training standards adopted by the Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology. The author of numerous papers on psychoanalytic topics and associate editor of Contemporary Psychoanalytic Studies, contributing editor of Division/Review and Journal of Psychology and Clinical Psychiatry, his book entitled Hypocrisy Unmasked: Dissociation, Shame, and the Ethics of Inauthenticity was published by Aronson in 2010. Humanizing Evil: Psychoanalytic, Philosophical, and Clinical Perspectives, co-edited with Dr. Jon Mills, will be published by Routledge in 2015.

  4. 4.

    Steven D. Axelrod, Ph.D., is a graduate of the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. He is the author of the 1999 book Work and the Evolving Self (Analytic Press), and has published articles on the psychology of work, male development, and the relationship between psychotherapy and executive coaching. He is a Contributing Editor to DIVISION/Review (a quarterly psychoanalytic forum), a member of the American Psychological Association’s Division 39 Research Committee and Fund for Psychoanalysis Task Force, and a principal of the Boswell Group (a network of psychoanalytic organizational consultants). He has an independent practice in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, and in executive advising in NYC.

  5. 5.

    Larry M. Rosenberg, Ph.D., recently ended a 27-year tenure as Clinical Director of the Child Guidance Center of Southern Connecticut where he continues to supervise senior clinicians, interns, and postdoctoral students at the Center. His career has been largely devoted to extending psychoanalytic principles to work within the public sector and the training of early career professionals. He is currently co-editing the Child Section of the PDM-2. He is past Co-Chair of the Education and Training Committee for Connecticut Association for Mental Health Clinics for Children and presently sits on the Boards of Sections II and V of Division 39 of the APA. He also has a private practice in Stamford, CT.

  6. 6.

    Sheldon Itzkowitz, Ph.D., ABPP is a Faculty member and Clinical Consultant at the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, Guest Faculty, the Eating Disorders, Compulsions, and Addictions Program of The William Alanson White Institute, and on the teaching and supervisory faculty of the National Institute for the Psychotherapies training program in psychoanalysis. He is an associate editor of Psychoanalytic Perspectives. He is in full time practice in Manhattan where he practices psychoanalysis, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, and provides clinical supervision. He has presented his work with extremely dissociated individuals both nationally and internationally.

  7. 7.

    Emily Kuriloff, Ph.D. is a Training and Supervising Analyst at the William Alanson White Institute, where she is currently Director of Clinical Education. She has taught at The New School, The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy, The Institute for the Psychoanalytic Study of Subjectivity, and The Institute for Psychoanalytic Education. She has recently (2014) completed a volume, Contemporary Psychoanalysis and the Legacy of the Third Reich. History, Memory, Tradition, in which she explores the impact of the Shoah – particularly the personal experiences of seminal clinicians caught in the European scourge – on psychoanalytic theory and praxis.

  8. 8.

    Robert M. Prince, Ph.D., ABPP, is Clinical Associate Professor, New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis where he is past Co-Chair of the Interpersonal Track. He is also Past-President of Psychologist-Psychoanalyst Clinicians, Section V of the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association and an Associate Editor of The American Journal of Psychoanalysis. He is author of The Legacy of the Holocaust: Psychosocial themes in the second generation. (1999). And editor of The Death of Psychoanalysis: murder? suicide? or rumour greatly exaggerated? (1999) and over 30 articles and chapters.

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In this contemporary Roundtable Discussion of “What’s effective in the therapeutic process” and “What Leads to Basic Change in Psychoanalytic Therapy?”, Drs. Ronald C. Naso, Steven D. Axelrod, Larry M. Rosenberg, Sheldon Itzkowitz, and Emily Kuriloff respond to each other and to Dr. Robert M. Prince, the editor of the Special Issue.

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Naso, R. RESPONSE TO THE RESPONSES… WHAT IS EFFECTIVE IN PSYCHOANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY? A HISTORICAL REPRISE. Am J Psychoanal 75, 159–168 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1057/ajp.2015.23

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