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Post-sovereign power and leadership

  • Leslie Paul Thiele
Article
  • 21 Downloads

Abstract

Power and leadership are typically theorized as exercises of sovereignty in the western tradition of thought. This essay takes up Michel Foucault’s challenge to escape the ‘spell of monarchy’ in our thinking in order to move beyond sovereign models of power. Interdisciplinary scholarship on complex adaptive systems provides fertile ground for this endeavor, illustrating the dynamics of post-sovereign power and opportunities for post-sovereign leadership. Viewing human organizations as complex adaptive systems helps us to theorize leadership without over-simplifying its nature or exaggerating its potential. It also undermines the prevailing identification of sovereign power as the only antidote for anarchy.

Keywords

power sovereignty complexity theory Foucault Arendt 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Limited 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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