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Subjectivity

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 247–263 | Cite as

Rapport sans rapport: the affective bond in suggestion and transference

  • Tim GrovesEmail author
Original Article
  • 21 Downloads

Abstract

As scholars have reconsidered early scholarship on affective contagion and immaterial forms of communication, there has been a renewed interest in Freud’s work on suggestion, telepathy and transference. This article will employ Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen’s critique of Freud to develop an alternative account of the relation between affect and subjectivity. I will argue that the performative identification or affective mimesis found in both the rapport of suggestion and the psychoanalytic transference creates and dislocates affect even in the absence of the hypnotist or doctor.

Keywords

Suggestion Transference Identification Affect Freud 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Limited 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of English, Film, Theatre and Media StudiesVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

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