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Journal of Public Health Policy

, Volume 37, Supplement 1, pp 13–31 | Cite as

Transforming Our World: Implementing the 2030 Agenda Through Sustainable Development Goal Indicators

  • Bandy X. LeeEmail author
  • Finn Kjaerulf
  • Shannon Turner
  • Larry Cohen
  • Peter D. Donnelly
  • Robert Muggah
  • Rachel Davis
  • Anna Realini
  • Berit Kieselbach
  • Lori Snyder MacGregor
  • Irvin Waller
  • Rebecca Gordon
  • Michele Moloney-Kitts
  • Grace Lee
  • James Gilligan
Viewpoint

Abstract

The United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development recognizes violence as a threat to sustainability. To serve as a context, we provide an overview of the Sustainable Development Goals as they relate to violence prevention by including a summary of key documents informing violence prevention efforts by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Violence Prevention Alliance (VPA) partners. After consultation with the United Nations (UN) Inter-Agency Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal Indicators (IAEG-SDG), we select specific targets and indicators, featuring them in a summary table. Using the diverse expertise of the authors, we assign attributes that characterize the focus and nature of these indicators. We hope that this will serve as a preliminary framework for understanding these accountability metrics. We include a brief analysis of the target indicators and how they relate to promising practices in violence prevention.

Keywords

sustainable development violence prevention indicators accountability measures 

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bandy X. Lee
    • 1
    Email author
  • Finn Kjaerulf
    • 2
  • Shannon Turner
    • 3
  • Larry Cohen
    • 4
  • Peter D. Donnelly
    • 5
  • Robert Muggah
    • 6
  • Rachel Davis
    • 4
  • Anna Realini
    • 4
  • Berit Kieselbach
    • 7
  • Lori Snyder MacGregor
    • 8
  • Irvin Waller
    • 9
  • Rebecca Gordon
    • 10
  • Michele Moloney-Kitts
    • 10
  • Grace Lee
    • 1
  • James Gilligan
    • 11
  1. 1.Law and Psychiatry DivisionYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.DIGNITY – Danish Institute Against TortureCopenhagenDenmark
  3. 3.Prevention of Violence Canada-Prévention de la violenceQuebec CityCanada
  4. 4.Prevention InstituteOaklandUSA
  5. 5.Public Health OntarioTorontoCanada
  6. 6.Igarapé Institute (Brazil) and the SecDev Foundation (Canada)University of Oxford and the Graduate Institute of International Studies in GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  7. 7.World Health OrganizationGenevaSwitzerland
  8. 8.Region of Waterloo Public Health and Emergency ServicesWaterlooCanada
  9. 9.University of OttawaOttawaCanada
  10. 10.Together for GirlsWashingtonUSA
  11. 11.New York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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