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Correction to: Why lower educated people are more likely to cast their vote for radical right parties: Testing alternative explanations in The Netherlands

  • Michael Savelkoul
  • Peer Scheepers
Correction
  • 172 Downloads

Correction to: Acta Politica (2017) 52, 544–573  https://doi.org/10.1057/s41269-016-0031-z

In the original publication of the article, Table 2 (Model 6) and Tables A1, A2, A3 in Appendix section contained some minor incorrectnesses. This has no impact on our conclusions, which remain unchanged. The correct Tables 2, A1, A2 and A3 are given below:
Table 2

Influence of educational attainment and mediators on radical right voting (N = 774)

 

Model 1

Model 2

Model 3

Model 4

B

SE

B

SE

B

SE

B

SE

Intercept

− 1.520

1.242

− 1.173

1.269

− 1.648

1.243

− .924

1.264

Educational attainment (years)

− .268

.066***

− .279

.067***

− .234

.067***

− .237

.067***

Interethnic contact

  

− .489

.329

    

Associational involvement

    

− .305

.164~

  

Social trust

      

− .371

.156*

Euroscepticism

        

Perceived ethnic threat

        

Anti-Muslim attitudes

        

Nationalistic attitudes

        

Authoritarian attitudes

        

Present relative deprivation

        

Future economic decline

        

Political trust

        

Nagelkerke R2

.201

.207

.211

.216

 

Model 5

Model 6

Model 7

Model 8

B

SE

B

SE

B

SE

B

SE

Intercept

− 2.284

1.300~

− 4.651

1.385***

− 5.427

1.431***

2.570

1.336~

Educational attainment (years)

− .244

.067***

− .185

.072*

− .196

.069***

− .270

.066***

Interethnic contact

        

Associational involvement

        

Social trust

        

Euroscepticism

.393

.187*

      

Perceived ethnic threat

  

1.395

.218***

    

Anti-Muslim attitudes

    

1.354

.244***

  

Nationalistic attitudes

      

.415

.191*

Authoritarian attitudes

        

Present relative deprivation

        

Future economic decline

        

Political trust

        

Nagelkerke R2

.213

.327

.294

.215

 

Model 9

Model 10

Model 11

Model 12

Model 13

B

SE

B

SE

B

SE

B

SE

B

SE

Intercept

− 3.009

1.311*

− 2.045

1.278

− 2.156

1.297~

− 1.111

1.296

− 6.579

1.648***

Educational attainment (years)

− .232

.067***

− .249

.066***

− .254

.066***

− .253

.067***

− .127

.076~

Interethnic contact

          

Associational involvement

        

− .220

.180

Social trust

        

− .133

.174

Euroscepticism

        

.015

.227

Perceived ethnic threat

        

.965

.250***

Anti-Muslim attitudes

        

.648

.286*

Nationalistic attitudes

        

.088

.219

Authoritarian attitudes

.566

.156***

      

.329

.167*

Present relative deprivation

  

.305

.167~

    

.109

.199

Future economic decline

    

.249

.151~

  

− .066

.179

Political trust

      

− .092

.083

  

Nagelkerke R2

.241

.210

.208

.204

.365

Source: Religion in Dutch Society (SOCON, 2011/2012)

All models are controlled for age, gender, religiosity, marital status, occupational status and region (results available upon request)

*** Significant p < .001; ** significant p < .01; * significant p < .05; ~ significant p < .10

Appendix
Table A1

Confirmatory factor analyses with oblique rotation (N = 774)

 

Factor

1

2

3

4

5

6

Decline of neighbourhood due to ethnic minorities

.779

.081

.062

− .009

− .065

.001

Presence minorities increases criminality Netherlands

.499

− .071

.084

.061

.274

− .137

Minorities get turn before Dutch people

.466

− .039

− .165

.046

.095

.099

Dutch people fired because of minorities

.531

− .007

− .136

− .012

.006

.138

Minorities are threat to our own culture

.652

.053

− .078

.125

.078

− .104

Education for ethnic children at expense of Dutch children

.651

− .019

− .066

− .016

.051

− .048

Presence minorities increases criminality neighbourhood

.596

.000

.014

.022

.021

.084

Muslims easily resort to violence

.220

.043

− .071

.014

.543

− .008

Muslim husbands dominate their wives

.007

− .014

− .030

.088

.620

.094

Muslims raise their children in authoritarian way

− .036

− .007

− .026

− .023

.550

.098

Muslims lock themselves out of Dutch society

.167

.032

− .001

− .018

.627

− .040

Most Muslims have no respect for homosexuals

− .029

.040

− .006

.036

.600

− .061

Be able to afford less coming years

− .066

.903

− .007

− .006

.085

− .084

Adjusting present lifestyle coming years

.011

.679

− .030

.028

− .048

.125

Worries about decline of financial prospects

.078

.743

.035

− .014

.001

.043

Difficulties to buy necessary things from salary

.073

.245

− .114

.057

− .026

.511

Very unsatisfied with present social standing

.016

.041

.002

− .079

.060

.468

Very unsatisfied with present income

.000

− .017

.036

.063

.023

.724

Netherlands have much to gain from EU membership

.005

− .047

− .639

− .062

.018

.009

EU posts a threat against the Dutch culture

.044

.045

− .755

.083

.001

− .073

Netherlands should cancel EU membership

− .022

.020

− .794

− .008

.017

.024

Proud to be Dutch

− .039

− .027

.021

.698

.065

.035

Dutchman should honour national symbols

.047

.028

− .013

.725

− .048

− .025

Source: Religion in Dutch Society (SOCON, 2011/2012)

Table A2

Correlation matrix attitudinal explanatory variables (N = 774)

 

Social trust

Euroscepticism

Perceived ethnic threat

Anti-Muslim attitudes

Nationalistic attitudes

Authoritarian attitudes

Present relative deprivation

Future economic decline

Political trust

Social trust

1.000

− .254***

− .225***

− .219***

.049

− .085*

− .179***

− .079*

.191***

Euroscepticism

 

1.000

.353***

.280***

.035

.204***

.180***

.135***

− .354***

Perceived ethnic threat

  

1.000

.618***

.253***

.314***

.218***

.225***

− .123**

Anti-Muslim attitudes

   

1.000

.215***

.294***

.245***

.211***

− .126**

Nationalistic attitudes

    

1.000

.230***

.027

.082*

.178***

Authoritarian attitudes

     

1.000

.144***

.138***

− .095**

Present relative deprivation

      

1.000

.438***

− .204***

Future economic decline

       

1.000

− .237***

Political trust

        

1.000

Source: Religion in Dutch Society (SOCON, 2011/2012)

***Significant p < .001; **significant p < .01; *significant p < .05

Table A3

Descriptive statistics (N = 774)

 

Range

Mean/per cent

Std. Dev.

Dependent variable

Radical right voting (voting for the PVV)

0/1

8.40 per cent

 

Independent variable

Educational attainment (years) (6=0)

0–15

6.45

2.85

Mediating variables

Interethnic contact

0/1

31.65 per cent

 

Associational involvement (# org.)

0–3

1.03

1.11

Social trust

0–4

2.48

0.85

Euroscepticism

0–4

1.52

0.74

Perceived ethnic threat

0–4

1.82

0.75

Anti-Muslim attitudes

0–4

2.44

0.69

Nationalistic attitudes

0–4

2.82

0.79

Authoritarian attitudes

0–4

2.48

1.12

Present relative deprivation

0–4

1.24

0.84

Future economic decline

0–4

2.16

0.99

Political trust

0–10

5.63

1.58

Controls

Age (18 = 0)

0–52

28.12

13.10

Gender

 Male (ref.)

0/1

43.93 per cent

 

 Female

0/1

56.07 per cent

 

Religiosity—church att. never/hardly ever (ref.)

0/1

56.07 per cent

 

 Religiosity—church att. sometimes

0/1

26.10 per cent

 

 Religiosity—church att. once a month or more

0/1

17.83 per cent

 

Marital status—not married (ref.)

0/1

29.20 per cent

 

 Marital status—married

0/1

57.49 per cent

 

 Marital status—divorced/widowed

0/1

13.31 per cent

 

Occupational status high (ref.)

0/1

18.73 per cent

 

 Occupational status low

0/1

14.34 per cent

 

 Occupational status mid

0/1

37.34 per cent

 

 Occupational status other (unemployed/students etc.)

0/1

29.59 per cent

 

Region north (ref.)

0/1

24.29 per cent

 

 Region large cities

0/1

5.30 per cent

 

 Region west

0/1

25.06 per cent

 

 Region east

0/1

15.25 per cent

 

 Region south

0/1

27.00 per cent

 

 Region suburban district

0/1

3.10 per cent

 

Source: Religion in Dutch Society (SOCON, 2011/2012)

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Limited 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyRadboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands

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