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Maritime Economics & Logistics

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 119–137 | Cite as

The Maritime Security Management System: Perceptions of the International Shipping Community

  • Vinh V Thai
  • Devinder Grewal
Original Article

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of a research project on the Maritime Security Management System (MSMS) conducted at the Australian Maritime College (AMC) in 2005–2006. The main objectives of this study are to identify key shore-based and near shore activities associated with maritime operations that are currently not covered by the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code and players involved in these activities; to explore and analyse important relationships among them, which can affect the management of security; to investigate the key criteria of a good/effective security management system; to explore the perceived effectiveness of some major aspects of security activities in a MSMS; and to identify the perceived importance of essential elements in a MSMS. Based on this identification and analysis, essential inputs that should be included in the curriculum of maritime universities and training institutions are proposed. This study applies a two-stage methodological approach, in which a focus group discussion is utilised first to explore the initial ideas from maritime experts, followed by a mail survey to reflect the perceptions of the international shipping community. The findings of this study provide essential insights to the formulation of such a global MSMS for the sake of safer and more efficient maritime transport.

Keywords

Maritime Security Management System security culture shore-based activities security relationships security elements security education and training 

References

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan Ltd 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vinh V Thai
    • 1
  • Devinder Grewal
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Maritime and Logistics ManagementAustralian Maritime CollegeLauncestonAustralia

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