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Comparative European Politics

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 328–338 | Cite as

Messy Grand Narrative or Analytical Blind Spot? When Speaking of Neoliberalism

  • Sean Phelan
Review Article

A Brief History of Neoliberalism D. Harvey Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005

Internalizing Globalization: The Rise of Neoliberalism and the Decline of National Varieties of Capitalism S. Soederberg, G. Menz, and P. G. Cerny Palgrave, Hampshire, 2005

Showcasing Globalisation? The Political Economy of the Irish Republic N. J. Smith Manchester University Press, Manchester, 2005

Introduction

As shorthand for giving conceptual definition to the global ascent of a balder, market-centric political logic, ‘neoliberalism’ will perhaps inevitably be invoked in ways that suggest an all too neat doctrinal coherence.1 The use of the term risks two distinct pitfalls. The first is the overly reductive use of a necessarilyreductive term, where its expanse becomes so broad, its implications and effects so monolithic and totalizing, that the fact of its different articulations is occluded; or sidelined as ‘merely’ a matter of rhetoric. The principal risk here is that this inculcates a mode of...

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan Ltd 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sean Phelan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication and JournalismMassey UniversityWellingtonNew Zealand

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