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Journal of Public Health Policy

, Volume 33, Supplement 1, pp S186–S201 | Cite as

An institutional research agenda: Focusing university expertise in Tanzania on national health priorities

  • Joyce R MasaluEmail author
  • Muhsin Aboud
  • Mainen J Moshi
  • Ferdinand Mugusi
  • Appolinary Kamuhabwa
  • Nana Mgimwa
  • Phyllis Freeman
  • Alex J Goodell
  • Ephata E Kaaya
  • Sarah B Macfarlane
Original Article

Abstract

A well-articulated institutional health research agenda can assist essential contributors and intended beneficiaries to visualize the link between research and community health needs, systems outcomes, and national development. In 2011, Tanzania's Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) published a university-wide research agenda. In developing the agenda, MUHAS leadership drew on research expertise in its five health professional schools and two institutes, its own research relevant documents, national development priorities, and published literature. We describe the process the university underwent to form the agenda and present its content. We assess MUHAS's research strengths and targets for new development by analyzing faculty publications over a five-year period before setting the agenda. We discuss implementation challenges and lessons for improving the process when updating the agenda. We intend that our description of this agenda-setting process will be useful to other institutions embarking on similar efforts to align research activities and funding with national priorities to improve health and development.

Keywords

health research health priorities Tanzania 

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joyce R Masalu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Muhsin Aboud
    • 2
    • 4
  • Mainen J Moshi
    • 3
  • Ferdinand Mugusi
    • 2
  • Appolinary Kamuhabwa
    • 5
  • Nana Mgimwa
    • 4
  • Phyllis Freeman
    • 5
  • Alex J Goodell
    • 6
  • Ephata E Kaaya
    • 2
  • Sarah B Macfarlane
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS)School of Dentistry, and Directorate of Research and Publications, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS)Dar es SalaamTanzania
  2. 2.School of Medicine, MUHAS
  3. 3.Institute of Traditional Medicine, MUHAS
  4. 4.Directorate of Research and Publications
  5. 5.Center for Social Policy, John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, University of MassachusettsUSA
  6. 6.Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California San Francisco (UCSF)San FranciscoUSA
  7. 7.School of Medicine, and Global Health Sciences, UCSF

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