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Between global ambitions and local change: how multi-level cooperation advances norm implementation in weak states

  • Anne Jenichen
  • Andrea Schapper
Original Article

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to investigate in which ways multi-level actor cooperation advances national and local implementation processes of human rights norms in weak-state contexts. Examining the cases of women’s rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina and children’s rights in Bangladesh, we comparatively point to some advantages and disadvantages cooperative relations between international organisations, national governments and local NGOs can entail. Whereas these multi-level actor constellations (MACs) usually initiate norm implementation processes reliably and compensate governmental deficits, they are not always sustainable in the long run. If international organisations withdraw support from temporary missions or policy projects, local NGOs are not able to perpetuate implementation activities if state capacities have not been strengthened by MACs. Our aim is to highlight functions of local agency within multi-level cooperation and to critically raise sustainability issues in human rights implementation to supplement norm research in International Relations.

Keywords

cooperation development human rights post-conflict weak states 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jean Monnet Centre for European Studies, Universität BremenBremenGermany
  2. 2.Institut für Politikwissenschaft, Technische Universität DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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