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European Political Science

, Volume 9, Supplement 1, pp S1–S10 | Cite as

Forty Years of European Political Science

  • Luís de Sousa
  • Jonathon Moses
  • Jacqui Briggs
  • Martin Bull
Original Article

INTRODUCTION

This Special Issue on ‘Forty Years of European Political Science’ is part of the celebrations of the ECPR's 40th anniversary in 2010. Founded in 1970, the ECPR is now the largest and most important political science association in Europe, and, in terms of size, is rivalled worldwide probably only by its American counterpart, the American Political Science Association (APSA). However, the two associations are markedly different in genesis and nature, the ECPR standing out as the only institution-based (instead of individual-based) political science association. With approximately 350 member institutions, the ECPR touches on the lives of thousands of individual political scientists, and the Consortium is forever striving to improve and expand its services to its members. One element of this service is the provision of a network of publications, including book series, journals and its own Press. European Political Science (EPS) is part of this publishing network. Founded in...

References

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Copyright information

© European Consortium for Political Research 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luís de Sousa
  • Jonathon Moses
  • Jacqui Briggs
  • Martin Bull

There are no affiliations available

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