European Political Science

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 223–243

Political Science in Central-East Europe and the Impact of Politics: Factors of Diversity, Forces of Convergence

  • Rainer Eisfeld
  • Leslie A Pal
Profession

Abstract

External forces have pushed Central-East Europe's nascent political science disciplines toward convergence: the European Union's educational policies, the funding and training activities of public and private Western players, most prominently the ‘Open Society’ institutes and organizations established by financier George Soros. However, considerable disparities persist regarding national and international cooperation, research quality, and representation of professional interests. These disparities are in large part explained by the fact that the institutionalization of political science has been stunted in places where ‘hybrid’, semi-autocratic political regimes have emerged.

Keywords

Central-East Europe state of the art westernization of education hybrid regimes Soros post-communist 

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Copyright information

© European Consortium for Political Research 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rainer Eisfeld
    • 1
  • Leslie A Pal
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Social SciencesUniversity of OsnabrückOsnabrückGermany
  2. 2.Centre of Governance and Public Management, Carleton UniversityOttawaCanada
  3. 3.School of Public Policy and Administration, Carleton UniversityOttawaCanada

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