European Political Science

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 316–329

American Faith-Based Politics in the ERA of George W. Bush

  • John C Green
Symposium

Abstract

During the era of George W. Bush, American religion was very diverse, including membership in many religious traditions and variation in religious traditionalism within these religious traditions. Both kinds of religious differences were highly politicised and embedded within the major party coalitions at the mass and elite levels. This pattern is likely to persist, but may not always benefit the Republicans as in the Bush era, as revealed by the religious elements of the 2008 election.

Keywords

religion tradition religious traditionalism American elections George W. Bush 

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Copyright information

© European Consortium for Political Research 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • John C Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Ray C. Bliss Institute of Applied Politics, University of AkronAkronUSA

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