Development

, Volume 57, Issue 3–4, pp 416–422 | Cite as

Mothers of the World Unite: Gender inequality and poverty under the neo-liberal state

  • Melinda Vandenbeld Giles
Thematic Section

Abstract

Much literature on globalization and increasing inequalities has failed to fully acknowledge how women, specifically mothers, are both excluded and included within global markets. Despite the neo-liberal reliance upon the poorly remunerated or unpaid labour of women and mothers, there has been distinctive silence in terms of recognizing this economic and political contribution. This article is an attempt to start a pivotal conversation regarding the specific positionality of women, particularly mothers, within the neo-liberal paradigm, and the ways in which a transformative feminist alternative economic paradigm can be imagined.

Keywords

mothering feminism political economy neo-liberalism globalization poverty 

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Copyright information

© Society for International Development 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melinda Vandenbeld Giles

There are no affiliations available

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