Contemporary Political Theory

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 168–217 | Cite as

Humanism from an agonistic perspective: Themes from the work of Bonnie Honig

  • Mathew Humphrey
  • David Owen
  • Joe Hoover
  • Clare Woodford
  • Alan Finlayson
  • Marc Stears
  • Bonnie Honig
Critical Exchange

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mathew Humphrey
    • 1
  • David Owen
    • 2
  • Joe Hoover
    • 3
  • Clare Woodford
    • 4
  • Alan Finlayson
    • 5
  • Marc Stears
    • 6
  • Bonnie Honig
    • 7
  1. 1.University of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  2. 2.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  3. 3.City UniversityLondonUK
  4. 4.Queen Mary, University of LondonLondonUK
  5. 5.University of East AngliaNorwichUK
  6. 6.University CollegeOxfordUK
  7. 7.Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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