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The relationship between consumer involvement and brand perceptions of female cosmetic consumers

Abstract

This study investigates young women's involvement with cosmetics using Kapferer and Laurent's consumer involvement profile (CIP). Using the CIP, five cosmetic consumer types are identified and their perceptions for cosmetic brands are compared. An electronic survey measuring consumer involvement, brand personality and brand attitude was administered to a sample of female participants at a mid-Atlantic university in the United States. Cluster analysis was used to identify consumer types and multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between brand personality and brand attitude within each consumer type for the three most popular American cosmetic brands identified for the female sample. This study pinpointed five consumer involvement types for the young female cosmetic market. Results showed that a combination of brand personalities predict a positive brand attitude in every consumer type across all three cosmetic brands. Interesting similarities, as well as differences, in brand perceptions were found across consumer types and brands. Brand personality ‘competence’ appeared as the most common predictor of a positive brand attitude across all brands and consumer types. This study shows that segmenting young females into cosmetic involvement types can provide useful tools for marketers to better understand the dynamics of brand perceptions in relation to consumer groups and specific cosmetic brands. In addition, the results provide special insight into gauging consumer perceptions and developing successful brand strategies.

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Author information

Correspondence to Hye-Shin Kim.

Additional information

1received her BS in both fashion merchandising and business administration from the University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA. She is currently a graduate student in the Master of Science in Psychology program at Shippensburg University, Shippensburg, PA, USA.

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Guthrie, M., Kim, H. The relationship between consumer involvement and brand perceptions of female cosmetic consumers. J Brand Manag 17, 114–133 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1057/bm.2008.28

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Keywords

  • consumer
  • cosmetics
  • product involvement
  • brand personality