Apidologie

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 23–28

Sperm utilization in honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata and A. m. capensis) in South Africa

  • Michael J. Holmes
  • Michael H. Allsopp
  • Lee-Ann Noach-Pienaar
  • Theresa C. Wossler
  • Benjamin P. Oldroyd
  • Madeleine Beekman
Original Article

Abstract

We artificially inseminated queens of Apis mellifera scutellata and A. m. capensis with equal numbers of drones of both subspecies to determine the effects of sperm genotype on rates of sperm utilization. Contrary to a previous study we did not find a consistent overrepresentation of workers sired by A. m. scutellata males in the first four months after insemination. Interestingly, our study does suggest that there is a significant interaction between drone and queen genotype in both subspecies, with queens of each subspecies producing more workers sired by drones of the same subspecies.

Keywords

Apis mellifera scutellata Apis mellifera capensis sperm competition Africanization hybrid zone 

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Copyright information

© INRA, DIB-AGIB and Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Holmes
    • 1
  • Michael H. Allsopp
    • 2
  • Lee-Ann Noach-Pienaar
    • 3
  • Theresa C. Wossler
    • 3
  • Benjamin P. Oldroyd
    • 1
  • Madeleine Beekman
    • 1
  1. 1.Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Lab, School of Biological Sciences A12University of SydneyNSWAustralia
  2. 2.Honeybee Research SectionARC-Plant Protection Research InstituteStellenboschSouth Africa
  3. 3.Department of Botany and ZoologyUniversity of StellenboschMatielandSouth Africa

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