Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 209–212 | Cite as

What do academic primary care physicians want in an electronic journal?

  • Dario M. Torre
  • Scott M. Wright
  • Renée F. Wilson
  • Marie Diener-West
  • Eric B. Bass
Brief Report

Abstract

To determine the interest of academic general internists and family physicians in specific features of electronic journal publications, we surveyed 350 physicians, 175 randomly selected from each of 2 medical societies: the Society of General Internal Medicine, and the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine. The response rate was 70%. Most general internists and family physicians used online journals sometimes or often. Most general internists and family physicians reported moderate to high interest in having links from original articles, reviews, or editorials to listed references (77% to 89% of internists and 65% to 81% of family physicians) and electronic medical reference texts (73% to 78% of internists and 65% to 83% of family physicians). Less than 25% of both groups reported moderate to high interest in having links to initiate dialog with other readers or to communicate comments to the author or editor. General internists were more likely than were family physicians to have moderate to high interest in having links to appendices and supportive material (e.g., 66% of general internists versus 46% of family physicians for original articles; P<.05) and less likely to have moderate to high interest in links to health-related web sites (44% of general internists versus 69% of family physicians for original articles; P<.05). We conclude that academic general internists and family physicians have strong but not identical interests in specific features of electronic publication that primary care-oriented journals should consider.

Key words

electronic journals primary care physicians 

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dario M. Torre
    • 1
  • Scott M. Wright
    • 1
    • 2
  • Renée F. Wilson
    • 1
  • Marie Diener-West
    • 3
  • Eric B. Bass
    • 1
  1. 1.Received from the Department of Medicinethe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimore
  2. 2.the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical CenterBaltimore
  3. 3.the Department of Biostatisticsthe Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimore

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