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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 14, Supplement 1, pp S45–S50 | Cite as

Improving physicians’ relationships with patients

  • William Clark
  • Mack Lipkin
  • Howard Graman
  • Jeannette Shorey
Article

Keywords

Medical Interview Manage Care Plan Manage Care Setting Improve Physician Physician Burnout 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Clark
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mack Lipkin
    • 3
  • Howard Graman
    • 4
  • Jeannette Shorey
    • 5
  1. 1.the American Academy on Physician and PatientMcLean
  2. 2.Mid Coast HospitalBath
  3. 3.New York University Medical CenterNew York
  4. 4.the Cleveland ClinicCleveland
  5. 5.Harvard Pilgrim Health CareBoston

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