Gender Socialization in Latino/a Families: Results from Two Retrospective Studies

Abstract

In this article, we present findings from 2 studies designed to explore gender-related socialization in Latino/a families. In Study 1, 22 adult Latinas (ages 20–45) completed in-depth interviews. In Study 2, 166 Latino/a college students (58% women; M age 21.4 years) completed self-report surveys. Study 1 findings suggest that many Latino/a parents socialize their daughters in ways that are marked by “traditional” gender-related expectations and messages. Results of Study 2, which included descriptive analyses and the creation of scales to explore family correlates of gender-related socialization, support and expand these findings. Male and female respondents described different experiences of household activities, socialization of gender-typed behavior, and freedom to pursue social activities or gain access to privileges. Parental characteristics, particularly gender role attitudes, were linked to gender-related socialization. Findings are discussed in light of the developmental and cultural literature on gender-related socialization.

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Correspondence to Marcela Raffaelli.

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Raffaelli, M., Ontai, L.L. Gender Socialization in Latino/a Families: Results from Two Retrospective Studies. Sex Roles 50, 287–299 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:SERS.0000018886.58945.06

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  • Latino/a families
  • gender socialization
  • parenting