Economic Freedom and Taxation: Is There a Trade-off in the Locational Competition Between Countries?

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationshipbetween economic freedomand taxation. We argue that an economicallyfree environment improvesthe attractiveness of a location, which, inturn, enables governmentsto levy higher business taxes. To test thishypothesis empirically, weestimate the impact of economic freedom onthe national tax policy,where the latter is measured by thecorporate tax revenue related toGNP (corporate tax ratio). We utilize adata set of 46 developed and lessdeveloped countries between 1980 and 1997and find a clear confirmationof our hypothesis. Further, a simulationanalysis reveals that the observedchange in economic freedom has equalizedthe international distributionof corporate tax ratios.

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Egger, P., Winner, H. Economic Freedom and Taxation: Is There a Trade-off in the Locational Competition Between Countries?. Public Choice 118, 271–288 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:PUCH.0000019904.30629.33

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Keywords

  • Public Finance
  • Economic Freedom
  • Business Taxis
  • Locational Competition
  • High Business